All posts by Lily Yuan

Frontiers Are All Around Us

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By now everyone’s seen the Levi’s Go Forth overwhelmingly revolutionary campaign on TV, in magazines, in subways, on buses. Levi’s is clearly investing in a new revolution, that’s actually quite…pretty.

As a follow-up, Levi’s partnered again with Wieden+Kennedy to launch an 11-episode web series Explore: To Work, in association with IFC and Sundance Channel. The series will premiere on July 4th and will document the revitalization of Braddock, Pennsylvania.

And what’s branded content without some actual brand presence? Apparently many of the residents wore Levi’s Work Wear Collection for fall – jeans, denim trucker jackets, work shirts.

It’s definitely one step closer towards Levi’s going beyond the splash ad campaign and providing a real story on “American pioneers” for its audience. I was a huge fan of Bank of America presenting History Channel’s America: The History of Us, so I look forward to seeing how this town reinvention plays out.

Another interesting in-store extension is the creation of Levi’s Workshops – multi-use community spaces to focus on a specific craft like printmaking, photography, or other things where people like to get together, collaborate, and create something. First one is launching this month in San Francisco.  Next one will be in NYC this fall.

Click here for the trailer, directed by John Hillcoat

Addressing Branded Entertainment Effectiveness and ROI

 

CMOs are constantly under pressure to prove ROI/Effectiveness of brand marketing to the C-suite for the billions they spend on media and brand building. They’re looking to “do more with less” and at the same time apply pressure on their advertising and media agencies to address the topic of ROI and effectiveness.

 

We see many clients shift their attention to specialty (borderline necessary) marketing services such as digital, mobile, and entertainment. The landscape has shifted where we should focus on consumer engagement over general awareness, develop content distribution strategies via dynamic multi-media platforms rather than only cover traditional channels, and embrace the notion of distributing content by anyone, anytime rather than “rent” disposable media a la the 30-second spot.

 

Branded entertainment is constantly evolving to address the shifting landscape and create fully-integrated marketing programs for brands. Because branded entertainment creates inherent cultural value that builds consumer relevance and activates the brand-consumer dialogue, it’s important that we address effectiveness/ROI.

 

Branded Entertainment Effectiveness/ROI

 

Measurement tools should not only track the effectiveness of media spend, but also extend their scope to measure the long tail effects of branded entertainment and original content.

 

Clients care about ROI in measurement buckets such as awareness, media, and sales. It’s important that we dig deeper to clearly distinguish between these baseline values and values that content can create:

 

 

- Engagement with content that extends beyond baseline impressions and reach (i.e., digital, social media, PR), as content creates higher emotional and newsworthy relevance for consumers to interact with

 

- Added value beyond what your media dollars get you. It’s about the additional value of the media reach associated with content distribution, i.e. deep discounts as a result of effective negotiations and partnerships with networks, production companies, and talent agencies

- Sales generated as a result of extending consumer reach and strengthening relationships

- Value gained from extending the use of content via additional channels, i.e. repurposing the same original content to serve more purposes like internal communications, video case studies, and more

 

 

Feedback? Thoughts?

 

 

 

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Domo Gets a Slurpee Brain Freeze!

7-Eleven always brings back the good memories. Free slurpees on 7/11, brain freezes, that awesome Simpsons in-store takeover a few years ago. And now Japanese character Domo is making a splash in stores nationwide! (Just walked by a 7-Eleven on the way to work – definitely going back to check it out some more.)

Domo is a brown blockhead with feet, also known as a lovable fart monster, created by Tsuneo Goda, and is the mascot for Japanese TV station NHK. Domo’s fall plans include covering 7-Eleven stores for six weeks starting October 1st with Domo Slurpee and coffee cups, fuzzy Domo toys that hang off Slurpee straws, hot dog containers, open-mouth Domo candy displays. You can also try their new Domo-inspired red apple flavor Fuji Frost or purchase Domo goodies like collectible action figures, abbreviated Manga comic book just for 7-Eleven, DVDs (supposedly a roundup of video clips, fan-created animations, commercials, Japanese spots), plush characters and clothing.

According to AdWeek, Evan Brody, marketing manager for Slurpee and Big Gulp Brands seems to also like the new takeover: “Domo lends itself well to the store and our proprietary products and our consumers who… love crazy Japanese shit.” If that’s the ultimate slice of the 7-Eleven customer profile, I think I can be cool with that.

A 3-webisode series will also be promoted on www.domonation.com and http://www.slurpee.com/Promotions/Domo/. These films were created by dwarf inc., the original creator of Domo’s stop-motion animation. Check out the first and second one here:

Domo’s First Slurpee

 

 

Domo’s Journey

 

 

Perhaps next on the list, some Murakami spring or Kid Robot summer action? LOVE.

 

          

 

Check www.slurpee.com on October 12th and 19th for the 2nd and 3rd episodes:

 

More pictures can be found on Eat Me Daily blog:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Video of the Week: The PUMA Index - If the stock goes down, make the clothes come off

 

Finally, a reason to celebrate when the market flops.

Puma tasked Droga5 to create a digital campaign to promote the launch of their new underwear line. Introducing a new line’s probably not the best thing to do during a retail dry spell, not to mention who can forget David and Victoria Beckham as the reigning couple of the sexy underwear world?

The new campaign is very clever, and very simple – The PUMA Index – an iPhone application and online stock ticker where as the stocks go down, the models’ clothes come off, revealing just their PUMA Bodywear. Just choose a market, choose a model, and keep things light and happy.

 

 

                       

 

We wouldn’t know either 1superviking.

Tired of looking at those negative red numbers on the stock tickers? Clearly Puma’s sick and tired, too.

 

 

 

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Sony’s Mobile Movie – On Two Screens? It’s called “Pair Movie.”

Have you ever shared a headphone with your buddy on the train or while standing in a really long line? A few nodding heads to each other acknowledging it was a “good” song…but eventually you get in the doldrums of your friend’s playlist and *poof* you take your own iPod out to listen to the “better stuff.” The concept of “sharing” goes kaput.

Sony took sharing to highest of all levels (perhaps for now) in Japan and promoted pop star JuJu’s song “Sunao Ni Naretara” (Wish I Could be True to Myself) via the mobile music video “Pair Movie.” Sony has asked teen and young women to share the video in half, literally – like cutting a television into two so one gets the right side and the other gets the left.

 

 

The video was split up across 5 episodes and can be downloaded for free from www.sonymusic.co.jp/drama/juju. Visitors can download the video by taking a picture of a QR code or directly from the mobile site.

 

 

Some quick stats:
•    Played 320,000 during the first month
•    2.2M+ downloads to date
•    Over 150,000 copies of the song were sold
•    “Sunao Ni Naretera” become JuJu’s biggest hit

And speaking of QR codes, I’d like to end this post with yet another Japanese realization of just how much potential QR codes have:
 

Louis Vuitton’s Takashi Murakami QR Codes

 

 

 

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